Framing Your Needlepoint Canvas with Framebridge

It took me almost two years from purchase to framing but I’m finally 100% done with my chicken project!

I’m usually all about designing my own needlepoint canvases but this one caught my eye and had me mesmerized. I should probably mention that I first saw it online and didn’t pay much attention to the size. When I went in person to Waste Knot to buy it and I saw how big it was, I had a moment of panic. How on earth was I going to wrap my arms around that thing? How was I ever going to sit down long enough to make visible progress on it?

I had my doubts about my abilities, but by that point I had fallen in love with the canvas so I figured that I owed it to myself to at least give it a try.

Onyx wanted to get in on the photo shoot!

Onyx wanted to get in on the photo shoot!

The stitching itself was a super slow process. There were months that I would be so productive, and others I would forget about the project entirely. The chicken has been on a couple trips with me (across state & country lines!) but moving forward it’s going to have to settle for hanging in my room.

Have you used Framebridge? The DC-based framing company has been on my radar for nearly a year and I’ve been waiting for just the right project to test it out on. Enter No-Name Chicken.

I don’t frame a whole lot because a) I find it incredibly expensive, b) I find it overwhelming, c) I’m horrible about hanging anything on my walls but after framing this needlepoint canvas, I’m inspired to turn that trend around. The Framebridge process was so simple and the price point so reasonable (for custom framing) that I’ve already got two prints ready to go into matching frames to go alongside my chicken.

That’s the problem with putting a single frame on a large wall, you’ll want to add more, and maybe even build a gallery wall. Speaking of gallery walls, this.

His enthusiasm for the photo shoot didn't last long

His enthusiasm for the photo shoot didn't last long

One question I got while stitching this project was: why frame it rather than turn it into a pillow? This might seem obvious to some but pillows get a lot of wear and tear. Not as much as belts grant you but still. If you’re using loose stitches that might come out if handled too much over time, consider framing your project! Ready to frame your needlepoint project? Check out all the frames that Framebridge has to offer!